Monday, August 16, 2010

Online photo print

Before few days I wanted to print a collage poster and for that I tried in Udaipur Local Market but no one was ready to print a collage off 20x30 size. Then I started online hunt for a better printing service.

I reviewed picsquare.com, snapfish.in, zoomin.com and gkvale.com. I tested the online uploader and collage designer but wasn't satisfied. Some had fixed layout and fixed background colors, while other didn't gave options to design the collage with the flexibilities I needed. Plus the price were not within my budget.

Then I came across iTasveer. With its DoodlePad, I could resize, move, rotate, skew images, and I could select custom background themes. I was able to assign borders and frames to the images and a shadow effect too. There were custome emoticons/clip art shapes to fill in the gaps. I got the 20x30 collage delivered at my home within 3 days and for Rs. 590. :) And believe me the paper quality and the print of the collage was awesome. A perfect glossy finish !!!

You can use Flickr/Picasa images with this and you can share your albums across the world. I am lucky to find such a greater service and glad to share it across the friends.

I bet you cannot find a better online printing service than iTasveer.

Sign-up and place the first order using this discount code OjalD29PN18C513, you will get a 15% discount on your first order or use this link to sign up

Thursday, July 29, 2010

When Money Dies - Adam Fergusson


I have the PDF version which can be downloaded from here.

An obscure little book is capturing reader imagination like never before. 'When Money Dies' by Adam Fergusson was last heard retailing as high as Rs 73,000 at an online retailer! In fact, as per reports, this book has caught even Warren Buffett's fancy. The world's greatest investor has termed it a must read. Now, what exactly is this book and why this new found interest in it? This book is perhaps an indicator of the dangerous times that lie ahead of us. It highlights how an unchecked growth in money printing can cause disastrous consequences if not controlled on time.

We all know that enormous amount of money has been printed in most parts of the world, particularly in the US. And this is certainly quite inflationary. The only thing that is keeping it in check is the fact that people are holding on to their money and not spending it as quickly as before. However, such a scenario may not last long. People's willingness to spend money can change so suddenly that it can catch economists completely by surprise. And then all hell can break loose. Inflation can go completely out of control. So out of control that as per the book, during the German hyperinflation of 1920s, it took 1 trillion German marks to buy just one unit of English currency! Money lost its value so fast that it was not unusual to see people taking home their wages in suitcases or covering their wall with paper money because it was cheaper than wallpaper. Rest assured there are even more chilling accounts in the book of how the economy completely broke down in Germany.

We may certainly not have an inflation as bad as that happened in Germany. But we are definitely setting ourselves up for a huge disaster if we do not act on time. As the author of the book recently mentioned, "Politically, now is the only time tightening can be done. In a year or so it won't be possible politically any more". We hope Messrs. Bernanke and company are listening.

While we try and get our hands on a copy of the book, which book would you recommend as essential reading for a stock market investor? Tell us about it

I have the PDF version which can be downloaded from here.


If you are the owner of a little-known book on economics published in 1923 called When Money Dies: The Nightmare of the Weimar Collapse by Adam Fergusson, then you could have made yourself some money. The book describes what could happen if European governments try to spend their way out of the recession. And shows how the German economy was brought to its knees back in the 1930s by hyperinflation (remember people carrying banknotes about in wheelbarrows to buy a loaf od bread?) after public spending was allowed to run out of control.

The reason the book has suddenly become so valuable is that it was recommended by billionaire investor Warren Buffett to a Dutch financier. The Dutch financier went out and bought up a couple of hundred copies for the Dutch parliament and the book’s price shot up in value (supply and demand in action) copies have been changing hands for up to $2,400 and the copies on sale at Abebooks and Amazon at the moment start at $600.

Publisher Old Street Publishing has rushed out a new paperback edition to satisfy the demand, but if you have an old copy of the 1923 edition lying around then don’t give it to your local charity shop, unless you are feeling generous. You might also like to consider scouring bookshops, the afore-mentioned charity shops, your granny’s attic etc… to see if you can get your hands on a first edition (preferably in good condition).

If you just want to read the book to see what might happen to the economy, it is a very good albeit scary read apparently, then you can get the paperback copy here When Money Dies: The Nightmare of the Weimar Hyper-inflation, but for an investment you will need a copy of the 1923 edition at a good price – When Money Dies: The Nightmare of the Weimar Collapse .

I have the PDF version which can be downloaded from here.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Life Insurance Glossary - W

Warranty
A statement concerning the condition of the item to be insured which is made for the purpose of permitting the underwriter to evaluate the risk; if found to be false, it provides the basis for void of the policy

Weekly benefits (for Personal Accident Insurance)
They are paid for the period of temporary total disablement following an injury which is admissible under the policy

Workers Compensation
A system of providing for the cost of medical care and weekly payments to injured employees or to dependants of those killed in the course of or arising out of their employment in industry in which Absolute Liability is imposed on the employer, requiring him or her to pay benefits prescribed by law

Written Premiums
The premiums on all policies which a company has issued in some period of time.


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Monday, February 8, 2010

Friday, January 29, 2010

Life Insurance Glossary - U

Uberrimae Fidei
Means "Utmost Good Faith'. The basis of all insurance contracts - both parties to the contract are bound to exercise good faith and do so by a full disclosure of all information material to the proposed contract.

Umbrella Liability
Insures losses in excess of amounts covered by other liability insurance policies; also protects the insured in many situations not covered by the usual liability policies

Under-insurance
The situation where the Sum Insured is less than the total value of property at risk.

Underwriter
The company receiving premiums and accepting to cover the risk. Also, the person employed by the company who decides whether the company should accept a particular proposal for insurance or application for revival

Underwriting
The process of selecting risks for insurance and determining in what amounts and on what terms the insurance company will accept the risk.

Underwriting Profit or Loss
The amount of money, which an insurance company gains or loses as a result of its insurance operations

Unearned premium
That portion of the original premium for which protection has not yet been provided because the policy still has some time to run before expiration.

Unenforceable Contract
This is one, which lacks some evidential features. The contract is a valid one otherwise, but could not be enforced in a court of law

Uninsurable Risk
Risks not acceptable for insurance due to excessive risk

Utmost Good Faith
A duty imposed on both parties to an insurance contract. The legal duty implies full disclosure of all facts material to the contract during negotiations of the contract.


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Saturday, January 23, 2010

Life Insurance Glossary - T

Tail coverage
An extended reporting period extension under claims-made liability policies that provides coverage for losses that are reported after termination of the policy

Technical provision
Amount set aside on the balance sheet to meet liabilities arising out of insurance contracts, including claims provision (whether reported or not), provision for unearned premiums, provision for unexpired risks

Tenants Liability
Cover for damage to rented buildings

Theft
The unlawful taking of property of another: the term includes such crimes as burglary, larceny and robbery.

Third party
Someone other than the insured and insurance company

Third party claim
A demand made by a person against a policyholder and any payment that will be made by that company

Third Party Liability
Liability incurred by the insured to another party but excluding contractual liability

Tornado
A whirling wind over land, accompanied by a funnel-shaped cloud. It is usually very violent and destructive in a narrow path, often for many miles

Tort
A civil wrong, other than a breach of contract, for which a court of law will afford legal relied

Total Disability
An illness or injury which prevents an insured person from continuously performing every duty pertaining to his/her occupation or engaging in any other type of work

Total Loss
The complete loss or destruction of all the property insured under a particular policy

Treaty
A reinsurance contract under which the reinsured company agrees to cede and the reinsurer agrees to assume risks of a particular class or classes of business

Turnover
The money earned for goods supplied or services rendered in the course of the business at the premises specified in the policy.


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Thursday, January 14, 2010

Life Insurance Glossary - S

Salvage
Recovery made by an insurance company by the sale of property which has been taken over from that insured as a part of loss settlement. The remains of damaged vehicle or any other property

Schedule
A list of coverages or amounts concerning things or persons insured

Self-Insurance
A form of risk financing through which a firm assumes all or a part of its own losses

Settlement
A policy benefit of claim payment

Short period rates
Percentage of annual premiums charged for short period policies

Short Rate Cancellation
Cancellation with a less than proportionate return of premium: also known as Pro Rata Cancellation.

Social Insurance
Compulsory insurance, in which the benefits are prescribed by law and in which the primary emphasis is on social adequacy rather than equity

Solvency margin
Surplus of assets over liabilities

Special Damages
Amount awarded in litigation to compensate for specific identifiable economic loss

Speculative Risk
A condition in which there is a possibility of loss or gain

Sprinkler Leakage Insurance
Insurance against loss from accidental leakage or discharge from a sprinkler system due to some cause other than a hostile fire or certain other specified causes

Standing Charges
Expenses which still have to be met even if a business cannot earn its full income owing to fire or other damage. These expenses do not diminish proportionately as a result of the damage

Statutory Inspections
Plant inspections which are required by law to be carried out at stipulated intervals by a competent person who must also prepare a report in a prescribed form detailing the condition of the plant

Strict Liability
Liability for damages even though fault or negligence cannot be proven

Subrogation
It is defined as the transfer of rights and remedies of the insured to insurers who have indemnified the insured in respect of the loss

Subsidence
Occurs when the ground under a building moves downwards, often as a result of drying out too much

Sum Insured
The limit of liability of the insurers under a policy

Surety Bond
An agreement providing for monetary compensation should there be a failure to perform certain specified acts within a stated period: the surety company, for example, becomes responsible for fulfillment of a contract if the contractor defaults

Surplus
An amount by which the value of an insurer's assets exceeds their liabilities

Surrender Value
Surrender value is the amount payable to the policy holder on his surrendering his right under a policy and terminating the contract of insurance

Surrounding Property
Property belonging to the insured or in his custody or control except for the plant causing the damage or property being lifted

Surveyor
The company official who inspects property proposed and makes recommendations as to rating and loss reduction.



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Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Life Insurance Glossary - R

Rate
The pricing factor upon which the insurance buyer's premium is based

Recurring Clause
A provision in some health insurance policies, which specifies an period of time during which the recurrence of a condition is considered a continuation of a prior period of disability or hospital confinement

Reimbursement
The payment of the expenses actually incurred as a result of a accident or sickness, but not to exceed any amount specified in the policy

Reinstatement
The restoration of a lapsed policy

Reinsurance
Insurance placed by an underwriter in another company to cut down the amount of the risk assumed under the original insurance

Renewal
Continuance of coverage under a policy beyond its original term by the insurer's acceptance of the premium for a new policy term

Renewal Notice
The notice sent to the policyholder to remind him that an insurance is due for renewal by insurers

Renewal Receipt
The written evidence that a renewal premium has been paid

Repatriation Expenses
(Under Overseas Mediclaim Policy) Expenses incurred to travel back to home country following sickness abroad

Replacement Cost
The cost to repair or replace property at construction costs prevailing at time of loss; the cost to repair or rebuild property without any depreciation

Representation
Statements made by an applicant in the application that he represents as being substantially true to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, but which are not warranted as exact in every detail

Rescission
Termination of an insurance contract by the insurer on the grounds of material misstatement on the application for insurance

Reserve
Liability set up for particular purposes

Respondentia
An early form of marine insurance on cargo; similar to bottomry, the equivalent on hulls

Restoration
Reinstatement, as the amount of coverage after a loss

Retention
The act of retaining an exposure to loss: also that part of the exposure that is retained

Retrocession
The amount of risk that a reinsurance company reinsures; the amount of a cession which the reinsurer passes on

Retrospective Date
The first date for which claims will be paid under a claims-made policy of liability insurance

Return Premium
An amount due the insured upon cancellation of a policy

Revocable Beneficiary
A beneficiary designation that may be changed by the policy owner without the consent of the existing beneficiary

Rider
Usually known as an endorsement, a rider is an amendment to the policy used to add or delete coverage

Risk
It can be a potential source of loss or the subject matter of insurance itself

Risk Management
A scientific approach to the problem of dealing with the pure risks facing an individual or an organization in which insurance is viewed as simply one of several approaches for dealing with such risks

Robbery
The unlawful taking of property by violence or threat of violence

Running Down Clause
Additional coverage, which can be added to, an Ocean Marine Hull policy to provide protection for damage to another ship caused by collision.

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